Queen Maud Land

Queen Maud Land
Queen Maud Land is a 2.8 million square kilometer (one million square mile) sector of Antarctica claimed as a dependent territory by Norway. The territory lies between 20° west and 45° east, between the British Antarctic Territory to the west and the Australian Antarctic Territory to the east. The northern and southern borders are not officially defined, although it is presumed to extend from the South Pole to 60° south. The territory comprises one-sixth of the total area of Antarctica. Most of the territory is covered by the Antarctic ice sheet. The sea off the coast of Queen Maud Land is called King Haakon VII Sea by Norway. The territory is named for Queen Maud (1869–1938), queen consort of King Haakon VII of Norway. It is one of two Antarctic claims made by Norway, the other being Peter I Island. They are administrated by the Polar Affairs Department of the Norwegian Ministry of Justice and the Police in Oslo. The claim is subject to the Antarctic Treaty System. Hjalmar Riiser-Larsen was the first person to set foot in the territory in 1930, and on 14 January 1939 the territory was claimed by Norway. From 1939 until 1945, Germany claimed New Swabia, which consisted of part of Queen Maud Land. On 23 June 1961, Queen Maud Land became part of the Antarctic Treaty System, making it a demilitarized zone. The territory is generally divided into five sectors. The sectors are, from the west, Princess Martha Coast, Princess Astrid Coast, Princess Ragnhild Coast, Prince Harald Coast and Prince Olav Coast. There is no permanent population on Queen Maud Land, although there are twelve active research stations housing up to a couple hundred scientists, the number fluctuating somewhat depending on season. Six are year-round stations, while the remainder are seasonal summer stations. The main airport for intercontinental flights is Troll Airfield, near the Norwegian Troll research station.


Notice: For data enrichment ZEFYS utilises database entries coming from freely available Internet-Sources (like Wikipedia, dbpedia, etc.) Please note, that these texts and documents are in the only responsibility of the respective supplier. In particular, the Berlin State Library is not able to fix broken hyperlinks within these texts or documents - we apologize for any inconvenience.