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Rudston

Rudston
Rudston is a small village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated between Driffield and Bridlington approximately 6 miles (9.7 km) to the west of Bridlington, and lies on the B1253 road. According to the 2001 UK census, Rudston parish had a population of 390. The place-name 'Rudston' is first attested in the Domesday Book of 1086, and means 'rood' or 'cross' stone, referring to the monolith. However, the name 'rud' derives from Old Norse ruð, meaning a clearing or pasture. So the place name could be stone in the clearing Ruðstane. Nearby Howes of Duggleby and Ba'l (In Ugaritic mythology Baal is the lord of the storm; he bears a mace where Thor will grasp a hammer) also indicate Norse Viking place names rather than Anglo-Saxon Origins. Here stands the Rudston Monolith; at over 25 feet (7.6 metres) tall, it is the tallest standing stone in England, and gave the village its name; it is Grade I listed. Rudston Roman villa, noted for its mosaics, was first excavated in 1839. It was subsequently re-excavated in the 1930s, 1960s and 1970s. Rudston Grade I listed Anglican parish church is dedicated to All Saints. Of 14th century origin, it was restored in 1861 by George Fowler Jones. It contains the gigantic organ, originally of four manuals, given by Sir Alexander McDonald of the Isles. Now a 3 manual instrument, it stands at the West end of the church in the original case. The author Winifred Holtby was born in Rudston and is buried in the church graveyard.

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